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Agricultural measurement

S/N:107000343

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+39 (0)335 6000699

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19th Century

  • £163
  • €185 Euro
  • $207 US Dollar

Italy

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Agricultural measurement

BIBLIOTHECA CULINARIA
Twenty litre (approx.) cylindrical container in wood with iron reinforcements. Like all “certified” measuring vessels it bears an official stamp (in this case a crown and a series of numbers and letters). Inside a small block of wood has been fixed to the base. This was essentially a trick for subtracting volume from the agricultural product that would have been measured. Known as the “quarta” this unit of measurement was widely used in the commercialization of olives on the western side of the Ligurian coast. Commonly employed in determining the amount of olives to bring to the press, it was far more common in rural areas than a scale.
The form of the majority of the nails in this piece lead us to believe that it dates from the late 1700s to the early 1800s. Not all of the nails are from the same period, but they are all quite old.
Some traces of worming, particularly to the base.

Height 22 cm
Diameter 35 cm
Circumference 107 cm

Period: 

19th Century

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BIBLIOTHECA CULINARIA

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Lodi
Italy

WWW.BIBLIOTHECACULINARIA.IT

Bibliotheca Culinaria began as a specialized publisher providing books to Italy's professional chefs. Our curiosity regarding culinary history led to an interest in material culture and the many tools and objects that relate to agriculture, cooking, and dining.

We've assisted restaurants, pastry shops, and hotels in locating unusual items for their decor and are always delighted to add to a collection of kitchenalia. We welcome the challenge of assembling groups of objects for maximum visual impact. Our stock, largely Italian and French in origin, encompasses a range of materials and eras from Alpine treen to French majolica, from copper pots to Murano glass.

We find objects that display signs of use to be particularly eloquent. Handling them, we are reminded of the lasting impact of simple quotidian gestures and they return us to the particular convivial atmosphere of past times.

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